Archive for July, 2014

Can Coriander (Cilantro) chelate metals?

July 31st, 2014

This herb is used in many food dishes and found in the Mediterranean Diet.

This herb is used in many food dishes and found in the Mediterranean Diet. A number of vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6 (Folate), Vitamin C., E & K are found in coriander including traces of minerals such as magnesium, potassium, iron, calcium, zinc.

HRCoriander Can Coriander (Cilantro) chelate metals?

Coriander.

contains antioxidants and has amazing antibacterial activity against germ negative and germ positive bacteria by breaking down cell membranes. Besides its antibacterial effect, the use of coriander oil in antibacterial formulations effectively kills pathogenic bacteria related to food borne diseases and hospital infections. It contains biosorbents effect to absorb liquids and solids: According to a study Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) essential oil: “Its antibacterial activity and mode of action evaluated by flow cytometry”. Filomena Silva, Susan Ferreira, Joao A. Queiroz and Fernanda C. Domingues – Journal of Medical Microbiology (2011), 60, 1479-1486 DO1 1Q10.1099/jmm 0.034157-0 034157 @2011 SGM.

While researching information on coriander, sometimes seemingly unrelated subjects can provide new leads such as The Uptake of Fluoride, Aluminum and Molybdenum By Some Vegetables From Irrigation Water by Arjun L. Khandare., G. Shanker Rao – National Institute of Nutrition (ICMR), J.Hum.Ecol., 19(4):283-288(2006). One of the vegetables used in the study for aluminum salt loading, was coriander. In a graph comparing amaranth and coriander from aluminum in irrigation water, the concentration of aluminum in coriander was 4 times greater compared to the control. The bottom line is that coriander absorbs metal ions from aluminum in water.

In 2005 Herbalix Restoratives sponsored a clinical study. The purpose of the study was to see how coriander works in HR topical Nighttime Cleansing Detox Deodorant®. We arranged for two labs to take tape samples of NCDD and a leading antiperspirant for comparison. The first lab used CuDerm Strippings consisting of 3 each of the NCDD, 3 of the antiperspirant and 2 blank strippings. The CuDerm Strippings were then transferred to a black paper and sent off to a second laboratory to be tested for ICP-MS Spectrometer analysis.

After testing the strips the second lab emailed back to the first lab to inform them that because they had applied the strips on a piece of black paper, the test results showed an abnormal reading of elevated alum from the NCDD over the antiperspirant. How could a deodorant contain this much aluminum? The answer is that all NCDD samples showed the ability to draw the black ink (made from aluminum) from the paper thus became a discovery showing the ability of NCDD to chelate aluminum from an inorganic source.

Below are the numbers that established the breakthrough.

1. Antiperspirants 1. 1,800
2. Negative Control 2. 7,000
3. Antiperspirants 3. 1,550
4. Antiperspirants 4. 1,370
5. Detox Deodorant 5. 115,000
6. Detox Deodorant 6. 120,000
7. Negative Control 7. 34,100
8. Detox Deodorant 8. 112,000

That works out to 70 times more aluminum that the NCDD extracted from the black paper.

For more information visit www.herbalix.com

Back in 2004 while learning from sources how third world countries used certain seeds to filter water, the idea of adding coriander seed to a deodorant, at that time a novel idea, brought forth an amazing discovery.

In 2006 HR sponsored a clinical trial evaluating subjects for levels of aluminum in the underarm, using the CuDerm tape strips. the first week was used as a baseline without applying any antiperspirant, the second week using antiperspirants and the third week, with the NCDD.

Baseline results gave variations of aluminum levels but all individuals showed asymmetrical loading in the non dominant arm (left and right). The second week using antiperspirants showed spiking in one arm vs the other. The third week, with the NCDD, showed reduction of aluminum in the underarms. Subjects returned to symmetrical levels (minimized the effects of antiperspirants) resulting in below baseline levels of aluminum indicating that NCDD was effectively absorbing aluminum.

Special Note: Baseline readings of aluminum variations in the samples demonstrate the human burden caused by aluminum (coming from air, water, food, antiperspirants, medication). Additional testing for metal loading can include skin as indicated in these studies.

In a follow up clinical trial in 2012, also using human subjects, it was clearly apparent in thermography scans that the NCDD and Sentinel Breast Crème® demonstrated symmetrical release of alum salts present in subjects tested. The asymmetrical loading of alum salts from antiperspirants can lead to health issues especially for women whose breast fluids drain thru the underarms.

These tests provide evidence of the ability for a topical detox with coriander to purge metals from the body.

“Aluminium in Human Sweat”: Clare Minshalla, Jodie Nadala, Christopher Exleyb,∗ a Life Sciences, The Huxley Building, Keele University, Staffordshire, United Kingdom b The Birchall Centre, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire, United Kingdom Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtemb.2013.10.002

Detoxing the Poor Little Armpit and More

July 25th, 2014

box underarms Detoxing the Poor Little Armpit and More

Detox your underarms with Herbalix Nighttime Cleansing Detox Deodorant.

We have all been seeing recent television commercials talking about “your poor little armpit” sponsored by a leading soap brand. The reality is that yes, your armpit IS getting a bad deal. But not for the reasons they say.

For some reason, since Mum, the first commercial deodorant brand was introduced in the late nineteenth century, everyone listens to them. The big personal care brands developed and manufactured and marketed deodorant and antiperspirant products, and people never even questioned this – so people have been listening and slathering chemical laden stuff underneath their arms ever since. Yuck and why?

Our human underarms are among the most consistently warm and moist areas of the human body. The sweat glands also provide moisture, which when excreted, has a cooling effect.

Deodorants were initially intended to prevent body odor caused by the bacterial breakdown of the perspiration underneath a person’s armpits. The same thing goes for feet, and other private and moist areas of the body. Then a special subgroup of deodorants were developed and they were named “antiperspirants,” affecting odor and designed to actually “prevent” sweating. This process happens by affecting a human’s sweat gland – something the Food and Drug Administration has classified and regulated as an over-the-counter drugs.

Think back, and you might remember the first commercial deodorant, Mum, which was was patented and sold in the late nineteenth century by an inventor in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, whose name has sadly been lost to history. Mum was briefly withdrawn from the market in the U.S., but it is now currently available at U.S. retailers under the brand name Ban.

There are studies globally proving that a small percentage of people are allergic to aluminum, and they can experience contact dermatitis when exposed to deodorants containing aluminum.

That said, the modern formulation of the antiperspirant was patented by Jules Montenier on January 28, 1941, called “Stopette” deodorant spray. Time magazine said that Stopette was “the best-selling deodorant of the early 1950s.”

But by the year 2007 a study stated that personal care products are potential contributors to the body burden of aluminum. Newer evidence has linked breast cancer with aluminum-based antiperspirants, and states that these chemicals, especially the aluminum in antiperspirants, are very bad for human beings.

A study published in the journal BMC Pediatrics, addresses infants and the early exposure to aluminum, pointing out that there is an urgent need to reduce the aluminum content of infant formulas. Headed by aluminum expert Dr. Chris Exley of the Keele University, it appears as if infant formulas used daily by millions to feed children up to 12 months-plus of age, are dangerous as they are contaminated with aluminum.

There is other information confirming that even the over-the-counter products labeled as “natural deodorant crystal” contains a chemical known as potassium alum which is bad for us. Labeled as a popular alternative to modern commercial deodorants, ammonium alum is a common type of alum sold in crystal form and often referred to as a deodorant crystal, and it has been used as a deodorant in the Far East, Mexico, Thailand, and other countries.

Antiperspirants and deodorants come in many forms, and keep in mind, what is commonly used in different countries worldwide will vary. As one example in the U.S., solid or gel forms rule, while in Europe the aerosol sprays are popular.

For more information about non-aluminum deodorant click here.

Visit www.herbalix.com